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Guide to 12 Types of Kitchen Sinks

Looking to upgrade your kitchen sink?

Whether you're looking to add the finishing touches on your kitchen remodel or have picked up a newfound love for cooking and need a more capable workspace, there are many reasons to update your sink.

We have compiled a list of 12 types of kitchen sinks ranging between style and material. Each type contains tips on best uses, pros and cons and counter fitting points. Once you've narrowed down to the sink that will best fit your needs, check out our extensive selection of kitchen sinks to find one that suits your kitchen.

Types of Kitchen Sinks

Below are 12 unique kitchen sink types based on style and material.

Farmhouse Sink

Farmhouse sink

A farmhouse style sink, also known as an apron sink, extends over the edge of your counter. This type of sink is most commonly used in a traditional or rustic farmhouse style kitchen and can be designed with a single bowl or double bowl. These sinks are gaining popularity with the resurgence of rustic and farmhouse interior design. They typically come as fireclay or cast iron and are incredibly durable and easy to clean because of their nonporous material. Farmhouse sinks have a deep basin perfect for big families, lots of dishes and cleanup. They can be pricey and are more difficult to install because you have to cut out a large portion of your counter.

Undermount Sink

Undermount sink

An undermount sink is installed directly under the counter, creating a seamless look from countertop to sink. This type of sink is versatile and works with most kitchen layouts. Not only do these sinks look sleek, but they also make for easy clean up because debris can be pushed straight into the sink without catching on a lip or rim. It's worth considering the weight of the sink that you choose since it is typically installed with glue which attaches to the underside of the counter and the sink. Most fireclay or cast iron sinks will not work with this installation method because of their heaviness.

Stainless Steel Sink

Stainless steel sink

Stainless steel sinks are light and easy to install, making them a functional and popular option. Stainless steel sinks are categorized by sheeting thickness, or gauge. A thicker gauge means the sink will typically be heavier and cheaper, while a thinner gauge will mean the sink is lighter and often more expensive. Stainless steel sinks tend to be noisier than other sink materials and they can dent, but they offer great heat and stain resistance.

Bar Sink

Bar sink

Bar sinks are installed in a home wet bar and are generally smaller and more shallow than your average kitchen sink, making them a secondary option. They are typically a single bowl design used for prep work, drink-making and convenient cleanup. If you have a large family or group of friends, a bar sink is great for entertaining in your home bar, patio or terrace.

Corner Sink

Corner sink

Corner sinks are double-basin sinks installed on a corner of your counter. The two basins are set apart from each other, in a catty-corner manner. This is a relatively unique design that can be useful if you are looking to maximize your counter space. Corner sinks can be expensive and difficult to install. Since most counters are seamed at the corner, custom cuts in the counter will add to the total cost of installing this type of sink.

Granite Composite Sink

Granite composite sink

Granite composite sinks are constructed by gluing crushed granite together with a resin filler. This type of sink is incredibly durable and stain resistant while also providing a cutting-edge and modern aesthetic to any kitchen. Granite composite has an inherent sound absorbing effect due to its density. If you're considering a granite composite sink, they are heavier than stainless steel sinks, so you may want to consider adding structural support to accommodate for the extra weight.

Cast Iron Sink

Cast iron sink

Cast iron sinks are sprayed with a porcelain coating that gives them a glossy white finish, which appeals to many homeowners looking for a sink to complement their vintage, farmhouse or country style kitchen. Cast iron sinks tend to be heavier and more durable than other sinks, but the porcelain can chip easily. These sinks are not meant to be cleaned with abrasive cleaners as they will wear down the enamel coating. You'll also need to use caution when washing dishes since the hardness of this sink can easily chip your dishware.

Kitchen Island Sink

Kitchen island sink

Kitchen islands are becoming increasingly popular and with that, so are kitchen island sinks. These sinks can be used as a primary or prep sink, depending on your needs. Kitchen island sinks are a great way to compliment your workflow and save you space on your main counter. They can also turn your kitchen island into a complete workspace. They look beautiful on a wood, granite or stainless steel island, so your options are endless in terms of design. If you are thinking about adding a sink to your kitchen island, be sure to consider the extra costs of installing plumbing to your kitchen island.

Kitchen Sink With Drainboard

Kitchen sink with drainboard

Kitchen sinks with drainboards are practical and eco-friendly. Typically found in stainless steel, drainboards are a built-in sink feature that makes food prep simple and mess-free. If you love to cook, this is a great option because it creates a designated food prep section of your counter. The drainboard also provides a spot to dry dishes and other kitchenware by allowing excess water to run off into the sink. This method leaves you with cleaner counters and saves energy by not using your dishwasher to wash and dry dishes.

Fireclay Sink

Fireclay sink

Fireclay sinks are made from clay and glaze fusing together at very high temperatures, upwards of 1600 degrees Fahrenheit. Fireclay sinks are almost identical to cast iron sinks but tend to be slightly more durable. They won't chip, etch or stain and you can use abrasive cleaners unlike on a cast iron sink. Fireclay sinks are usually more expensive than cast iron due to the more extensive fabrication process. This material is often used for farmhouse-style sinks, making it a great fit for hosting fun events, holidays or entertaining.

Single Bowl Sink

Single bowl sink

Single bowl kitchen sinks are great for small kitchens with limited counter space. Single bowl sinks make cleaning large cookware much easier because you can lay them flat at the bottom and not have to worry about debris splashing onto your counter. Single bowl sinks aren't great for multitasking like cleaning and cooking at the same time, so they're recommended for smaller households or single individuals.

Top Mount Kitchen Sink

Top mount kitchen sink

A top mount kitchen sink, also known as a drop-in sink, drops in to the counter which creates a lip or rim around the sink. This is a versatile option because it's easy to install and provides extra support meaning that you can use almost any material, no matter how heavy. One factor to consider is that grime and debris can get caught on the lip and can make the cleanup more difficult.

Before you make your final decision on a kitchen sink, consider your cooking habits, cleaning needs, counter space, style and budget. These key factors will help you determine what sink best suits you and your lifestyle.

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